Majors and Minors – Let’s get it straight

Nothing annoys me more than a poorly functioning lifeguard team. Most of the time it comes down to understanding “majors” and “minors”. Everyone reads more into this than necessary. Minor = one guard can handle the situation. Major = 2 or more guards required. That’s it! Nothing more. Most candidates attach an urgency to the definition. No! No! No! Again: Minor = one guard can handle the situation. Major = 2 or more guards required. In theory, angina could be handled by one guard; it’s a minor. Yikes! Isn’t angina serious? Yes, it could be an M.I. But how many guards do we need? One – if they can handle it. Does the patient respond to meds? Are they relatively stable? And so on.

What this means is how the team responds to various situations. If you have, for example, two guards on deck, one on break, and a guard calls for assistance, does the third guard take over the guarding or assist? If this guard takes over the guarding, it’s a minor. If the third guard assists, it’s a major. If the pool no longer has sufficient coverage – clear the pool. It is that simple.

Hope this helps you on your next recert. (and on the job)

LP